Andrey (azangru) wrote,
Andrey
azangru

As says Wikipedia:

When a phoneme is completely substituted by a glottal stop [ʔ], one speaks of glottaling or glottal replacement. This is, for instance, very common in Cockney and Estuary English. In these dialects, the glottal stop is an allophone of /p/, /t/ and /k/ word-finally, and when followed by an unstressed vowel (including syllabic /l/ /m/ and /n/) in a post-stress syllable.[3] 'Water' can be pronounced [ˈwɔːʔə] – the glottal stop has superseded the 't' sound. Other examples include "city" [ˈsɪʔi], "bottle" [ˈbɒʔʊw], "Britain" [ˈbɹɪʔən], "seniority" [sɪiniˈɒɹəʔi].

Given this definition, is the /t/ in Putin, as pronounced by many American speakers, glottalized?

Example: Maxine Waters.
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