February 10th, 2021

(no subject)

I am generally very skeptical of whorfianism (although, yes, I know, there are some suggestive experimental data about how grammar guides people's choices when they are asked to assign gender to genderless objects, etc.). However. I am amazed to see McWhorter argue against whorfianism largely on purely ethical grounds. I would have thought that it is completely irrelevant for the validity of a theory whether or not it happens to lead to moral or immoral conclusions:

(no subject)

A storm in a British teacup — a teacher of English at Eton has been dismissed because of an "anti-feminist" lecture he posted on youtube:





The teacher, bless him, hasn't yet deleted his video; so I could take a peek to see for myself whether it's worth the noise — and, besides, to satisfy my curiosity about how kids are taught at Eton. The video, if put on paper, would have made a very decent school-level essay; but, as many school essays are, it is all over the place. Quotes by famous people mixed with an assortment of historical facts, scenes from great books, references to movies, cartoons, or comics, and with some biological observations. In other words, full of anecdotes. Gives off an air of a well-rounded, well-read pupil. Has very little convincing power regarding the thesis itself.