April 11th, 2019

(no subject)

Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary (just a free online dictionary I consult for BrE) pronounces fungi (plural for fungus) with a hard /g/, and gives this as both the British and American norm. Merriam-Webster’s (a free online dictionary I consult for AmE) gives both variants, with /j/ and with /g/, the one with the /j/ listed first.

I am surprised by the absence of palatalization in the BrE variant.

(no subject)

Wanted to write how I’ve been hearing the phrase to agree a deal a lot lately and thinking how peculiar this usage of agreeing sounds, and how similar to the fairly recent Russian usage of согласовать in the sense of утвердить. Then I look it up in Merriam-Webster’s and see that for BrE it’s perfectly normal; but then something else arrests my attention. Is agree being a transitive verb in They agreed that he was right or She agreed to sell him the house? I thought a transitive verb is a verb that takes direct object, and the subordinate clause in the first example and the infinitive phrase in the second example, although they behave as direct object, aren’t generally regarded as such? Or are they?