Andrey (azangru) wrote,
Andrey
azangru

A software developer blogged about how he thinks developers are "complicit in our employer's deeds", and how he "hold[s] my peers accountable for working at companies which are making a negative impact on the world around them".

I've seen this opinion expressed too many times in social media to wonder — where are developers who hold the opposite view? The ones who would say that they are primarily interested in the technological challenges and learning opportunities presented by their jobs, or in their own livelihood and in the high salary offered by their employers; and that the rest of the world can bloody well take care of itself. The ones that would say that they already have plenty on their plate to think about, without having to also worry about convoluted moral problems; or that they do not want their choices and career options to be dictated by the ways their employers act in unrelated fields. Do such developers exist? Is it too boring an opinion to voice (but no, that can't be true; in the current information landscape, such a voice would be a novelty). Is it too petty bourgeois and egotistic, and thus too dangerous and "toxic", so that whoever holds such an opinion and knows what's good for them will keep it to themselves? Where are the technocrats; the mad scientists; the capitalist sharks? There is no battle of ideas; it's just one and the same idea repeated over and over and over again.

Has it always been like that, or has it changed over the last decade or two?
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